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Mnemonics related to immunology.

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Hypersensitivity, Autoimmunity, Immunology of transplantation and malignancy, Immune response, immune deficiency, structure and function of immune system etc.

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Immunoglobulins, and order B cells present them MADGE
(character from the old dishwashing liquid commercial):
1. IgM
2. IgA
3. IgD
4. IgG
5. IgE
Order of presentation by B cells (which is made first, IgD or IgM?) B cells
present IgM primarily, and then IgD.
Just remember why all of us are going through this pain...to become M.D's. For a
B cell to be competent, it must get its MD.
Finally, by the same rule, B cells must first release M then G
immunoglobulin on primary exposure.

Graves disease: etiology In Graves disease, the
thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins are of the IgGclass.

Dendritic cell: function DENDRITIC CELL:
Disguised in host tissue (but still have same function!)
ECF ingestion
Nothing left to chance (ensures an immune response)
Derived from bone marrow
Regulates the immune response
Induces an immune response (makes it unique among antigen presenting
cells)
Transfers information from the ECF into the cell
Immune tolerance (increases it)
Co-ordinates the adaptive and innate immune systems
Captures and processes antigen
Expresses lymphocyte costimulatory molecules
Llong processes extend from cell (stellate shaped)
Lives in lymphoid tissue
Secretes cytokine to initiate immune response

DiGeorge Syndrome: features The disease of T's:
Third and 4th pharyngeal pouch absent.
Twenty-Two chromosome
T-cells absent
Tetany: hypocalcemia

Chrug-Strauss syndrome: symptoms and signs PAVE:
P-ANCA
Asthma
Vasculitis
Eosinophilia

Immunoglobulin response to antigens: order of IgM vs. IgG "IMmunoGlobulin":
IgM is released first, followed by IgG.

Sjogren syndrome: morphology "Jog through the
MAPLES":
· Sjogren is:
Mouth dry
Arthritis
Parotid enlarged
Lymphoma
Eyes dry
Sicca (primary) or Secondary

Celiac sprue features CELIAC:
Cell-mediated autoimmune disease
European descent
Lymphocytes in Lamina propria/ Lymphoma risk
Intolerance of gluten (wheat)
Atrophy of villi in small intestine/ Abnormal D-xylose test
Childhood presentation
· Atrophied villi cause less absorption, so diarrhea, weight loss, less energy.

Hypersensitivity: type IV example Poison IVy causes
type IVhypersensitivity.

Immunoglobulins: which crosses the placenta IgG
crosses the placenta during Gestation.

Interferon gamma: action on macrophages "Th1nk BIG Mac
Attack":
Th1 and NK cells Build Interferon Gamma.
Causes Macrophages to have an augmented Attack [by better lysosome
function and increasing reactive oxygen metabolites, nitric oxide and defensins].

Passive vs. active immunity "Pay for Passive,
Active Ages":
Passive:Pay for a shot of antibodies for fast results following
exposure to Rabies, etc.
Active: Slow onset ("aging") and memory.

HLA-B27 associated diseases PAIR:
Psoriasis
Ankylosing spondylitis
Inflammatory bowel disease
Reiter's syndrome

Histamine: features HISTAMINE:
HCL production
Inflammation
Strong vasodilator
Therapeutic vaue none
Allergy
Mast cells
Neurotransmitter/ Narrow airways
IgE

T and B cells: types When bacteria enter body, T-cell says
to B: "Help Me Catch Some!" B-cell replies: "My
Pleasure!":
· T-cell types:
Helper
Memory
Cytotoxic
Suppressor
· B-cell types:
Memory cell
Plasma cell

MHC: loci creating class I vs. II Class 1 has 1
letter:
HLA I is HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C.
Class 2 has 2 letters:
HLA II is HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, HLA-DR.

Hypersensitivity reactions: Gell and Goombs nomenclature
ACID
· From I to IV:
Anaphylactic type: type I
Cytotoxic type: type II
Immune complex disease: type III
Delayed hypersensitivity (cell mediated): type IV

MHC I vs. II: T cell interaction The "=8" equation:
2x4=8, and 1x8=8.
MHC II goes with CD4.
MHC I goes with CD8.

Immunoglobulin (Ig) types: the important ones worth remembering, in
order of appearance MAGDElaine (a girl's name):
IgM
IgA
IgG
IgD
IgE
· Magdelaine tells you the order they usually appear: M first, then A
or G.
· Alternatively: IgM is IMmediate.

Acute inflammation features SLIPR:
Swelling
Loss of function
Increased heat
Pain
Redness
· "What a cute pair of slippers" can be used to tie acute
inflammation to SLIPR.

Lupus signs and symptoms SOAP BRAIN:
Serositis [pleuritis, pericarditis]
Oral ulcers
Arthritis
Photosensitivity
Blood [all are low - anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia]
Renal [protein]
ANA
Immunologic [DS DNA, etc.]
Neurologic [psych, seizures]

Goodpasture's Syndrome components GoodPasture
is Glomerulonephritis and Pnuemonitits.
· From autoantibodies attacking Glomerular and Pulmonary basement
membranes.

Complement: function of C3a versus C3b C3a: Activates
Acute [inflammation].
C3b: Bonds Bacteria [to macrophages--easier digestion].
· If wish to know more than just C3:
C3a, C4a, C5a activate acute.
C3b, C4bbind bacteria.

MHC I vs. MHC II properties "Immunity helps
to exterminate fun for bacteria"

HLA-DR genetic predisposition immune disease examples HLA-DR:
Hashimoto's disease
Leukemia/ Lupus
Autoimmune adrenalitis/ Anemia (pernicious)
Diabetes insipidous
Rheumatoid arthritis

Complement cascade initiating items: alternative vs. classic
Classic: Combined Complexes.
Alternative: Activators Alone, or IgA.
· Complexes are made of Ab and Ag combined together.
· Examples of activators: endotoxin, microbial surface.

answered May 4, 2013 by Mike Junior Resident (2,007 points)
0

•To memorize the four hypersensitivity reactions:
"ACID"
Type I - Anaphylaxis
Type II - Cytotoxic mediated
Type III - Immune complex
Type IV - Delayed hypersensitivity.

answered May 8, 2013 by anonymous
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